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True Crime Brewery

Jill and Dick are a married couple who love to drink beer and discuss true crime. Join them at the quiet end of the bar. Dick will bring along an excellent beer from the region where the crime occurred. He will give us a little beer lesson and review before Jill starts off their true crime discussion. The discussions are well-researched and in depth. Dick is a physician and often shares his medical expertise at Jill's urging.
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May 21, 2019

Jack Unterweger’s lust for violence was insatiable. His first known murder victim was Margret Schafer, an 18-year-old German girl. Unterweger would tell a jury that, at the moment of her killing, he had seen his mother reflected in her face and he acted out of a lifetime of rage. He was sentenced to life imprisonment. But in jail, Unterweger read voraciously and he began to write poetry, short stories, plays, and an autobiography. 

After over 15 years in prison, Unterweger was released based on the belief that writing his life story, and the self-reflection it required, had reformed him. Not only was he a famous author, he was also Austria’s most high-profile “rehabilitated” offender. 

But Unterweger had everyone fooled. As he interviewed police in the role of a journalist, he had already resumed his life as a serial killer.  Unterweger sexually assaulted and brutally murdered prostitutes in Vienna, Los Angeles, and Prague as he spoke on talk shows and worked to get his books made into Hollywood movies.

Join us at the quiet end today for The Devil Himself: Jack Unterweger. It’s the shocking story of an international serial killer who was hiding in plain sight.

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May 14, 2019

Apparently hard-working and intelligent mother of two and registered nurse, Kristen Gilbert, was living the life of a middle-class soccer mom. She had a good job, a loving husband, and two children. She seemed a lot like the other Massachusetts suburbanites in her neighborhood, but she held sinister secrets that eventually bubbled to the surface.

Beneath the façade of an ordinary working mother, Kristen lived a life of duplicity. Before her 30th birthday, she was arrested on suspicion of serial murder: injecting patients at the hospital where she worked with lethal doses of epinephrine. 

These were vulnerable victims and Kristen’s motives were a mystery, perhaps even to herself.  It may have been as simple as a need for attention and excitement. 

When a healthcare professional takes a life, it’s a special kind of evil.  Trained and relied upon to protect and restore health and virtually holding their patients’ lives in their hands, a nurse who kills betrays the most basic trust while preying on the sick.

Join us at the quiet end today for Murder by Nurse: The Victims of Kristen Gilbert.

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Madison Reed

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May 7, 2019

After suffering for years in an abusive marriage, Helle Crafts filed for divorce in the summer of 1986. Soon afterward, she disappeared. Her friends filed a missing person’s report, but her husband, Richard Crafts, gave various stories that Helle was off visiting relatives or that she just needed some time alone.

Police suspected foul play, but with no body, it was impossible to prove that a homicide had even occurred. Police did learn, however, that Richard Crafts had purchased several items, including new carpeting, bedding, and a large freezer, around the time of Helle’s disappearance. He had also rented a wood chipper.

A witness came forward, claiming that he had seen a man using a wood chipper on a bridge over a lake near the Crafts’ home.  That is when the search for Helle took a very disturbing turn.

Join us at the quiet end today as we discuss a horrific crime often referred to as the "wood chipper case.” Investigators, along with Dr. Henry Lee, the Director of Connecticut’s Forensic Science Laboratory at the time, worked together to solve what Richard Crafts had considered his perfect crime. I chose this case because it serves to broaden awareness of domestic violence and because it is chock a block full of interesting forensics from a pre-DNA era.

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Madison Reed

Apr 16, 2019

Middle-aged mother of two Susan Fassett was an unlikely victim in a love triangle that ended in her murder.  Married to a cop and a member of the church choir, Susan had a reputation as an honest, upstanding person.  After her death, the secrets revealed about her life came as a shock to most.

The biggest shock of all was that Susan was involved with a man commonly referred to as the scum of the earth. Fred Andros, a mean, homely, and amoral man, extorted money, frequented prostitutes, and somehow lured Susan into his web of corruption.

Join us at the quiet end today for a story of corruption, sex, and murder: A Secret Life: The Plot to Kill Susan Fassett.

Apr 9, 2019

A Florida woman saw the state patrol car's lights flashing behind her and wondered why she was being stopped. She didn't think she was speeding, she later told investigators, but she pulled her car onto the southbound shoulder of Interstate 95 and waited as Trooper Tim Harris approached her car.

Trooper Harris asked her to get out of her car.  Then he saw that she was obviously pregnant. He gave her a warning ticket for driving 6 miles over the speed limit and let her go. Police would later speculate that the woman's pregnancy saved her life.

The next woman pulled over by Trooper Harris would not live to see another day.  Lorraine Hendricks’ car was found abandoned on the highway and detectives suspected that someone she trusted was involved in her disappearance.

Trooper Harris was seen as trustworthy. He had been with the Florida Highway Patrol for eight years. Before that, he had worked for local police departments, earning several commendations. He was married with two young children. But a closer look would expose a troubled man.

Join us today for A Darker Shade of Blue, the terrifying story of a man who was called upon to serve and protect but turned into a dangerous predator.

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Apr 2, 2019

To say that Stella Nickell had a rough upbringing would be an understatement. She had a childhood of poverty, neglect, and abuse. At 16, she gave birth to a daughter, Cynthia. In the next 12 years, she had numerous failed relationships, a failed marriage, and spent time in jail. In early 1974, when she was 32, she met Bruce Nickell and they married.

One summer day in 1986, Bruce came home with a headache and took four Excedrin capsules. Stella said that her husband walked out on the back deck and suddenly collapsed. He was taken by helicopter to a Seattle hospital where he died. Doctors said Bruce died from emphysema, but Stella said that never made sense.

Almost two weeks later, Stella heard about the death of 40-year old Sue Snow. News reports said that the woman had died after swallowing cyanide-laced Excedrin. Stella immediately called the police to report that Bruce, too, had taken Excedrin right before he died.

Police initially focused on Sue Snow’s husband Paul Webking for her murder. But the call from Stella Nickell led to the conclusion that Sue Snow was not the only person killed by the poisoned headache medicine. Excedrin capsules were recalled and an investigation for murders by product tampering began.

Join us at the quiet end today for a discussion of the Seattle Cyanide Murders.  There is no doubt that it is a heartless act to kill a spouse, but what kind of a person kills at random?

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Madison Reed

Read "Bitter Almonds"

Mar 26, 2019

In 2012, Harold and Toni Henthorn celebrated their 12th wedding anniversary with a hiking trip in Colorado’s Rocky Mountain National Park. Toni plummeted off of a 100-foot cliff and died a horrible death. Harold told police that his wife was busy taking photos and must have slipped. He didn't see exactly what had happened because he was using his cell phone at the time.

It could have been a tragic accident. After all, Harold was a respected member of the community, a loving husband, and a devoted father to their daughter. He worked as a fund raiser for churches, charities and non-profit groups. At least, that's what he told everyone.

But maybe things weren’t what they appeared to be. Friends and family thought they knew him, but facts surfaced that painted a new picture of Harold Henthorn. Harold had no job and no income.  He also had a shady history, including a first wife who had also died in a freak accident.

Harold’s history, along with his ever changing narrative of Toni’s death, led to a murder investigation.  Life insurance, years of deceit, and inappropriate behavior were gathered to create a strong circumstantial case against him.

In today’s episode, Over the Edge, we look back at the lives of Sandra Lynn Henthorn and Toni Henthorn, two wives whose final moments were likely filled with fear and violence, murdered by the man who claimed to love them.

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Madison Reed

Mar 19, 2019

The case of physician Michael Swango not only exposed the dark side of a man who had taken an oath to do no harm, it also opened our eyes to a professional environment where doctors accepted the word of fellow physicians over that of nurses and patients—even as evidence of gross misbehavior piled up.

Michael grew up in Quincy, Illinois and graduated as valedictorian at the Quincy Catholic Boys High School. He served in the Marine Corps, receiving an honorable discharge in 1980. He then attended Quincy College followed by Southern Illinois University School of Medicine.

His troubles were first noticed in medical school. Although he was a brilliant student, he preferred to work as an ambulance attendant rather than concentrate on studying. Even at that young age, he had an odd fascination with dying patients.  Michael Swango’s patients often ended up "coding," or suffering life-threatening emergencies. Several died unexpectedly.

Join us at the quiet end today for a true story that actually is stranger than fiction: Taking Lives: The Crimes of Dr. Michael Swango.

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Madison Reed

Read "Blind Eye"

Mar 12, 2019

Baptist minister Matt Baker presented himself to the world as a man of God, a family man who set an example for his faithful parishioners.  But when his wife Kari was found dead in their bed of an apparent suicide, questions about who he really was emerged.  Kari Baker’s mother and aunts would become the catalysts to investigate Matt Baker’s deceptions and lies, working with police to expose him as a narcissistic bully and a lifelong sexual predator.

What they uncovered would open up suspicions of his involvement in not only one, but two, family deaths. But it took years to get justice for his wife and safety for his daughters. This story is a striking example of the power of love and determination and a victory of the truth over Matt Baker's carefully constructed life of hypocrisy.

Join us at the quiet end today for Ungodly: The Murder of Kari Baker.

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Mar 5, 2019

Between the ages of 17 and 24, Keli Lane had two abortions and gave birth to three babies, all without the knowledge of her mother Sandra or her police officer father Robert. Not only that, but her five pregnancies occurred while Keli was playing water polo at a national level and spent most of her time in a swim suit.

Keli’s 4th child, Tegan Lane, born in 1996, went home with Keli two days after her birth.  Keli was at a friend’s wedding that evening and not a word was spoken about her newborn daughter.  Tegan was never seen again.

Investigators believe that Keli killed Tegan, disposing of her body before her family and friends could learn of the infant’s existence.  Keli claims that she gave Tegan to her biological father and he disappeared with the baby.  Keli’s supporters appear to believe her story, but what is the likelihood that this man and Tegan would not be found?  More mysterious, perhaps, are the reasons for Keli’s multiple hidden pregnancies and overall strange behavior.

Today’s story is one of the oddest we have covered.  There are gaping holes in Keli Lane’s story, but also, there is no physical evidence that Tegan is dead. Join us today for a true mystery from Australia, Where is Tegan Lane?

Feb 26, 2019

In 1971, 13-year old Charlie Brandt shot his pregnant mother to death before turning the gun on his father and sister.  In the years that followed, he seemed to move forward and live a normal life with college, marriage, and a career.  Charlie and his wife Teri were a close, fun-loving couple--the kind of couple others envy.

Then, in 2004, a hidden life was revealed. Charlie was not who he appeared to be.  There was a darkness no one had seen. But there had been signs.

Charlie loved to fish and he was known to his fellow fishermen as an expert with a knife.  But Charlie’s expertise went beyond the world of filleting fish.  After his death, Charlie would be investigated as a prolific serial killer, victimizing women along the Florida coast.  He had a sexual obsession with his niece that would end with her brutal murder.

Join us at the quiet end for a fascinating story of a killer undercover: The Hidden Life of Charlie Brandt.

Feb 19, 2019

The case we’re talking about today, more than any in recent history, illustrates that we don’t always know the people close to us as well as we think we do.  We’re talking about the case of a family annihilator: Chris Watts.

In August of 2018, Chris murdered his pregnant wife and his two preschool-aged daughters.  Then he loaded their lifeless bodies into his truck and dumped them at a work site.  He was seen later that morning by co-workers and all of them would report that Chris acted normal, as if nothing abnormal had happened.

Investigators believe that Chris’s motivation for the murders was his desire to start a new life with his mistress.  This seems true enough, but it’s difficult to believe that this was the sole motive for the crimes. As we delve into the lives of Chris and Shanann Watts, deeper issues are exposed that most likely played a role in the murders.  There were serious financial problems and there was friction between Shanann and her in-laws.  Aspects of the couple’s relationship reveal that Chris may have been full of rage and resentment for Shanann.

Join us at the quiet end today for Portrait of a Family Annihilator: The Watts Family Murders. 

Feb 12, 2019

Julie Miller met Dennis Bulloch through a newspaper ad and fell hard for him. He seemed like the answer to all of her problems. As a successful executive approaching her 30th birthday, Julie was ready to get married. Dennis seemed like the all-American guy—good-looking and described as soft-hearted and sensitive by former girlfriends.

Just four months into their marriage, emergency responders were called out to a fire at the Bulloch’s home. Amid the charred debris, they found a body duct-taped to a rocking chair, the face burned beyond recognition.

This is a case that took place before Match.com or Tinder.  Julie was attractive and successful in her career but she was socially immature.  And she was lonely.  She wanted someone to spend her life with and to perhaps start a family of her own.

Dennis Bulloch seemed to check all the boxes for her, but he had a dark side she didn’t see.  If there were signs or clues to a darker side of Dennis, Julie may have overlooked them, because, more than anything, she wanted to be married. We’ll talk about this, as well as the histories of Julie and Dennis, in Happily Never After: The Murder of Julie Miller Bulloch.

 

Feb 5, 2019

Mick Philpott lived off of welfare benefits.  He had been unfaithful and violent towards women throughout his adult life. His reckless and selfish plan to frame an ex-girlfriend for leaving him would result in the death of six innocent children.

A father of 17 children, Philpott lived with two women and once appeared on a daytime talk show to demand a bigger government house for his oversized family.

But beyond the caricature of a welfare parasite, Philpott exposed a much more dangerous stereotype: a control freak whose violence toward women went on for more than thirty years. For Philpott, women were his domestic, sexual, and childbearing slaves and his children were evidence of his virility. This was a man who knew no shame and used everyone, even his own children, to get what he wanted.  Join us today for Shameless: Mick Philpott.

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Jan 30, 2019

Cherica Adams was joyful and magnetic. She was a beautiful 24-year-old who had worked as an exotic dancer and was establishing a career in real estate. She had done some acting, too, and appeared briefly in the movie House Party 3. Cherica became pregnant and appeared to have accepted that she would be a single mother. The father of her baby, professional football player Rae Carruth, was not happy about the baby to be and wanted her to get an abortion. With Cherica, as with his first child’s mother, Carruth did not embrace his role as a parent.


Carruth’s aversion to having children was no secret. In fact, he was very vocal about it. He reportedly joked about killing his children so he wouldn’t have to pay the mothers any money for their support.

 

The moments following the shooting that took Cherica’s life are immortalized in her 911 call. She’d been shot four times. She was crying, struggling to speak with the 911 operator, with her life leaving her body as she bled from her wounds.

 

The facts are shocking. This was a murder for hire, a plan by a cold-blooded man to kill his girlfriend and his unborn son. Cherica would speak for herself in court, through the 911 call recording and notes she wrote in the hospital. But justice in this case came with more difficulty than you might expect.

 

Jan 29, 2019

On February 14, 2007, stay at home dad Stephen Grant called the Macomb County Sheriff's office in Michigan to report that his wife, Tara Lynn Grant, had been missing for five days. In his story to the police, Stephen claimed that this was not the first time Tara had taken off, which was why he hadn’t reported her missing sooner. Stephen said that on the evening of February 9, he and Tara had argued. He then overheard Tara talking with someone on the phone, telling them, "I'll meet you at the end of the driveway". He said he saw her get into a dark-colored car a few minutes later and he had not seen or heard from her since.

Over the next two weeks, Stephen Grant made several TV appearances pleading for Tara to return. According to police, Stephen Grant was not cooperative with them throughout their investigation. And they began to question his relationship with the family’s 19-year old au pair. 

Investigators would ultimately discover that Stephen’s story of a missing wife was untrue and was, in fact, an elaborate attempt to sidetrack the police. According to later confessions, Stephen killed his wife during an argument after she had slapped and belittled him.  But insights into the couples’ relationship and evidence uncovered by the investigation have made this one of the most shocking and disturbing crimes in Michigan’s recent history. Join us at the quiet end today for our discussion of the life and gruesome murder of Tara Lynn Grant, in Blood on His Hands: The Murder of Tara Lynn Grant.

Madison Reed

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Jan 15, 2019

When you think of a mass shooter, you don’t envision someone like Amy Bishop.  Forty-five years old, female, Harvard-educated, Biology professor, and mother of four, Amy Bishop would seem an unlikely killer. 

It was 3pm on February 12, 2010, and thirteen professors and staff members from the University of Alabama Biology Department met in a third-floor conference room.  Plant biologist Gopi Podila passed out the printed agenda and sat beside Amy Bishop. Amy had a handgun in her purse.

Amy was normally quite vocal in these meetings, but that day she was silent and brooding.  She shot six of her co-workers, killing three, before she washed up and called her husband for a ride home.  The police arrived before he did.

But Amy’s homicidal rampage did not come out of nowhere.  Investigations into her background would reveal a troubled person with a history of violence and a probable cover up in her hometown in Massachusetts.

Today, in A Shooting in Alabama, we’ll delve into the life of a killer, atypical but just as devious and dangerous as any other.  At how many points in her life could she had been thwarted---and why wasn’t she?

Madison Reed

Note: Jill and Dick will be taking next week off. TCB will return on January 29th!

If you can't wait, you can sign up for members-only episodes at https://www.tiegrabber.com or by becoming a Patron at https://www.patreon.com/tiegrabber

 

Jan 8, 2019

Jana Eastburn was the sole survivor, just 22 months old, when her mother, Kathryn Eastburn, and siblings – 5-year-old Kara and 3-year-old Erin – were stabbed to death on May 9, 1985, in their Fayetteville, NC home. 

Jana had been abandoned in her crib for three days before police responded to the concerns of neighbors and entered the home. She was dehydrated and crying hysterically with her arms outstretched, alone within the carnage of the brutal triple murders of her mother and sisters.

Jana’s father, Air Force Captain Gary Eastburn, was away doing training in Alabama when his wife and daughters were killed.  Kathryn had placed an ad to rehome their dog because the family was planning to relocate to England.  The man who came to the house and took the dog, Sergeant Tim Hennis, became the primary suspect.

This case, including eyewitness testimony, physical evidence, and three trials, captured the attention of people across the country and continues to garner speculation. Join us at the quiet end today for our discussion of this complicated and fascinating case: The Eastburn Family Murders.

Madison Reed

 

Jan 1, 2019

Just before 9 p.m. on Sept. 24, 1973, 18-year-old Becky Thomson was leaving to buy groceries and asked her 11-year-old half-sister, Amy Burridge, if she wanted to tag along.

The two traveled in Becky’s Ford station wagon to the Thriftway store on 12th and Melrose streets in Casper, Wyoming.

When Becky and Amy came out of the store, one of the car’s tires was flat. Unbeknownst to the sisters, the two men who had slashed the tire, Jerry Jenkins and Ronald Kennedy, were the same guys who pulled into the parking spot next to them. The men offered to help.

Becky and Amy had been set up for an abduction.  That night was the night when Becky’s worst nightmare came true on the Fremont Canyon Bridge.  The cold-heartedness and cruelty of Jenkins and Kennedy was more than anyone in the community could comprehend, and it would haunt Becky until the day she died.

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Dec 25, 2018

JonBenet Ramsey was 6-years old when she was found murdered in the basement of her Boulder, Colorado home on the day after Christmas. Twenty-two years later, her murder remains unsolved. The reason why there has been no conviction in this case could be attributed to mistakes made by the Boulder Police Department right from the beginning of their investigation and to what many people define as a lack of cooperation by JonBenet’s parents, John and Patsy Ramsey.

There are only two possible answers to what happened that night. One is that an intruder crept into the house, killed JonBenét in a botched kidnapping attempt while the family slept, then took off, leaving behind a three-page ransom note. The other possibility is that she was killed by a family member. In going over the physical and circumstantial evidence in the case, we’ll address the mistakes in the police investigation that have hindered a conviction and allowed a child killer to remain free before we examine the theories of what actually happened in the Ramsey house that night.

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Sabre

Dec 18, 2018

The Daniels Family lived on Dasher Street in the town of Santa Claus, Georgia. Their one-story-red-brick house, with a huge chimney protruding from the front, was nestled snuggly at the end of a cul-de-sac.  For Kim Daniels, it was her dream home.

Kim was a drug addict, living out of her car, when Danny Daniels helped her fight off her addiction and fell in love with her. Kim regained custody of her three biological children and she and Danny were married.  Danny had a teenage daughter too, and the couple had taken in 3 foster children they planned to adopt. Kim wanted to give these children the childhood she never had.

One cool December night in 1997, The Daniels’ family was destroyed by a mass shooting that is now known as the Dasher Lane Massacre.  Four family members were killed, three children were kidnapped, and two children were inexplicably spared.

The village of 300 residents that had been named for Father Christmas and displayed a sign declaring itself “the city that loves children” was rocked by this tragedy.  And, when the killer was found, everyone in Santa Claus was forever changed.

Join us at the quiet end on this cool December evening for “The Santa Claus Murders.”

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Sabre

 

Dec 11, 2018

18-year old Heidi Allen was employed as a clerk at the D & W Convenience Store in New Haven, New York. She opened the store by herself at 5:45 a.m. on April 3, 1994 and her last transaction was recorded on the cash register at 7:42 a.m.

Several customers came and went after that, leaving cash for their purchases on the counter when they couldn’t find a clerk. Finally, a customer flagged down a sheriff's patrol car outside the store and reported that the business was open but unattended.

The investigation into Heidi’s disappearance would reveal that Heidi was likely taken against her will from the store. Her jacket, purse and car keys were left behind in the store when she vanished and her maroon station wagon was in the parking lot.

The primary suspect was the last customer known to be in the store before Heidi vanished. He told police that he had purchased two packs of cigarettes at 7:30 a.m. and left. Detectives didn’t believe him.  But there may have been more to Heidi’s story than a random abduction. There was something about Heidi that most people didn’t know.  Heidi was working as an informant for the police. Was Heidi the target of drug dealers who wanted to keep her quiet? 

Join us at the quiet end today for Where’s Heidi: The Kidnapping of Heidi Allen.

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Dec 4, 2018

It was a sunny July day in 2009 and 36-year old Diane Schuler was driving southbound in the northbound lanes of the Taconic State Parkway in New York.  Witnesses watched in horror as a minivan barreled down the parkway in the wrong direction. Blaring horns, flashing lights, and cars swerving out of her way made no difference. She appeared focused and deliberate as she continued to travel at a high speed toward oncoming traffic.

When the minivan collided head on with an oncoming car, it held five children. Diane, four children, and the three passengers in the other car were killed.  The investigation that followed revealed that Diane was intoxicated.  Toxicology tests revealed that she had recently ingested both alcohol and marijuana.  Her husband Daniel defended his wife, denying that she drank heavily or used drugs.

Daniel believes that there must have been a medical reason for Diane’s behavior.  Some believe it was an accident caused by alcohol and drug use. Others believe it was a murder/suicide.  Today we’re going to take a look at the day of the crash and the events in Diane’s life leading up to that day.  Diane’s life as a responsible professional and an attentive mother didn’t seem to mesh with her being an alcoholic with a death wish. So, what happened that day?  Join us at the quiet end for an in-depth examination of the facts in this tragedy.

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Sabre

Nov 27, 2018

On July 5, 2012, 16-year old Skylar Neese returned to her family's West Virginia apartment after working an evening shift at Wendy's. Her apartment complex's surveillance video showed that Skylar snuck out of the apartment through her bedroom window at 12:30 A.M. on July 6 and got into an unknown vehicle. Her father said that she did not take her cell phone charger and that her bedroom window was left open as if she planned on coming home before the morning. But she was never seen again.

Skylar was an only child who her parents would describe as a good kid.  But in the months leading up to her disappearance, Skylar had been hanging out with some rebellious and troubled friends, smoking pot, drinking, and joy riding around town. In the investigation that followed, Facebook posts and messages would reveal a strained relationship between Skylar and two of her best friends.  Police believed this social media trail could help them find Skylar, but the truth was something that would shock everyone and break her parents’ hearts. Join us at the quiet end today for Cruel and Unusual, a discussion of a young life callously cut short by those who no one, even Skylar, would have ever suspected.

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Sabre

Nov 20, 2018

The bodies of 27-year-old Rachel and 9-month-old Lillian Entwistle were found on January 22, 2006 in the master bedroom of their Hopkinton, Massachusetts home where the Entwistles had been living for only ten days. Autopsy results would show that Rachel died of a gunshot wound to the head and baby Lillian died of a gunshot wound to the stomach.

Just hours after the deaths of his wife and daughter, Neil Entwistle purchased a one-way ticket to London and boarded a British Airways flight. On January 23rd, Hopkinton Police located Neil at the home of his parents in Nottinghamshire, England. He told a detective that he left his home at around 9:00 AM three days earlier to run an errand, and that his wife and daughter were both alive and well and in the bed in the couple's bed when he left. When he returned at around 11:00 AM, he claimed to have found both had been shot dead. He then covered the bodies of his wife and infant daughter with a blanket and left. He did not call for help.

Neil Entwistle’s behavior after his family was killed brought suspicion upon him.  But what detectives discovered in their subsequent investigation was completely unexpected.  For a young professional couple living an apparently charmed life, what went on behind closed doors and on the Entwistle’s computer was very disturbing.  If being a shitty husband makes a man a murderer then Neil would be found guilty of these crimes.  But was there legitimate evidence proving that Neil was responsible?  Join us today for Cold as Ice: The Murders of Rachel and Lillian Entwistle.

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